List: Politics for Dummies Cheat Sheet

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List: Politics for Dummies Cheat Sheet

  • Are you comfortable with the groups and the individuals who support the candidate?
  • Ask questions of candidates and elected officials.
  • Be patient; other voters may be calling to express their views, too.
  • Be prepared to give your name and address.
  • Because you’ve only one vote to cast, your candidate choice is crucial. How do you know what to look for in a political candidate? Do a little research to help you get to know something about each candidate and use these useful tips:
  • Become a delegate to a national convention
  • Can you trust the candidate?
  • Candidates who identify problems — but don’t propose realistic solutions
  • Candidates who make appeals to your emotions — not to your intelligence
  • Candidates who offer simple, no-sacrifice solutions to complex problems
  • Candidates who talk exclusively about hot-button issues such as race, immigration, the flag, English as the official language, and class warfare, but not about such issues as taxes, health care, and the budget
  • Candidates who tell you what they think you want to hear
  • Candidates who use negative campaign tactics to give you a false impression of the competition
  • Candidates with shady dealings in their backgrounds
  • Circulate petitions and join with others who think as you do.
  • Contribute money or help the candidate raise money.
  • Do you agree with the programs and ideas the candidate has proposed?
  • Does he pass the elevator test? (If an elevator door opened in front of you and getting on meant you would ride alone with the candidate, would you get on?)
  • Does she have ideas of her own?
  • Does she have the education and experience to handle the job?
  • Does the candidate appear intelligent, or is he just filling out the suit?
  • Don’t hesitate to tell officials when they’ve done something you don’t like.
  • If you are calling about a particular piece of legislation, give the number of the bill, if possible.
  • Is the candidate a leader?
  • Is the candidate qualified for the job?
  • Join a political party.
  • Local office of the League of Women Voters
  • Public library
  • Read and listen to the information about the candidates — cast an informed vote.
  • Register to vote.
  • Remember to vote for your candidate on election day.
  • State election board
  • State or county headquarters of the Republican or Democratic party\n\nAsk the person to give you the following information (make sure you have your address book with you):
  • Tell the individual whether you are for or against the legislation and why.
  • Tell the person precisely why you are calling.
  • Thank officials when they do something you do like.
  • Use your phone, the mail, your fax, your computer e-mail — let your representatives hear from you often.
  • Volunteer your time — contact voters, organize events, distribute literature.
  • Vote in every election.
  • Vote in primaries.
  • Your congressional district, congressperson, and the office phone number
  • Your legislative district, state legislator, and the main number at the statehouse
  • Your state senate district, state senator, and a phone number at the statehouse
  • County board of elections or voter registration
Politics for Dummies Cheat Sheet
Scott Adkins
Scott Adkins
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